Mike Colter to empower up Power Man on Netflix

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Credits: Marvel.com

Credits: Marvel.com

Mike Colter to empower up Power Man on Netflix

Power Man is arriving to the original series cast of “Marvel’s A.K.A. Jessica Jones”. The ’70s originated superhero has a just over forty-years fan-favorite relevance that of recent decades belongs to a short list upon where popular comic book aliases have the prolonging fans query of the encircling paraphrase “When will we finally see this hero appear in a movie or TV series?”. Actor Mike Colter is that question’s answer, Santa hat included on top of it.

The likened fireworks-haloed announcement was presented by Marvel Entertainment yesterday, right on the Holiday Season time-frame.

The move to the Netflix episodic series by Colter succeeds his starring part as Jameson Locke on the Xbox mini-series “Halo: Nightfall”.

“Fans have longed to see Luke Cage and in Mike we’ve found the perfect actor,” said Jeph Loeb, Executive Producer/Marvel’s Head of Television. “Viewers will get to meet Luke Cage in ‘Marvel’s A.K.A. Jessica Jones,’ and experience why he is such an important super hero in the Marvel mythos.”

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A look to Dec.’s just past kick-off announcement named the first role cast set at Jessica Jones andgoing to Kristen Ritter (“Breaking Bad”, “Veronica Mars”). Colter will star alongside Ritter with their comic book-based roles adapting from the title’s source material.

Marvel outlines the premising introduction.

During the course of an investigation in New York City, private investigator Jessica Jones encounters the enigmatic Luke Cage – a man whose past has secrets that will dramatically alter Jessica in ways she could never have imagined.

A recurrence over multiple seasons on “The Good Wife” relived Colter in the well-recognized portrayal of the drug baron character Lemond Bishop. On a string of break-out performances the South Carolinian actor has distinguished his career in various films the likes of “Million Dollar Baby”, “Zero Dark Thirty”, and “Men in Black 3”. His television reprisals notably appeared on “The Following”, “Ringer” and the “American Horror Story” series.

Luke Cage’s comic book history began with a solo title. His continuity excelled at the point the superhero began the P.I. partnership Heroes for Hire, teamed with martial arts transcendent Danny Rand a.k.a. Iron Fist. Their teaming leagued them with the bionic-armed private detective Misty Knight and samurai phenomenon Colleen Wing. This alliance has been a long-standing identity for all four characters, but mainly an umbrella association highlighting central heroes Cage and Rand. While Iron Fist roots from the creative innovation of the Kung Fu film sensation that swept the 1970s, Power Man epitomized the Blaxploitation franchise craze into his comics at-large establishment.

Power Man first appeared in a starting titular Luke Cage, Hero for Hire. Comic book legendaries Archie Goodwin and John Romita, Sr. created this strong-man stylized superhero with unbreakable skin.

Netflix has already ordered a 13-episode pilot season for “A.K.A. Jessica Jones”.

(Marvel.com)

Read More by Mark Ruffin

Mark Hamill to again play The Trickster on ‘The Flash’

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Credits: DC Comics

Credits: DC Comics

Mark Hamill to again play The Trickster on ‘The Flash’

DC Comics, with HitFix, announced today that Mark Hamill (“Star Wars”) has signed on to play James Jesse, aka The Trickster, in an episode of the hit new “The Flash” series.

If this announcement seems familiar, no, you have not taken a trip on The Flash’s time traveling Cosmic Treadmill. Hamill, who played The Trickster on the 1990 “The Flash” series that originally aired on CBS, will again be playing the villain on The CW‘s current “The Flash” series, starring Grant Gustin.

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Birds of a Feather: 2nd Black Canary costume coming to CW’s ‘Arrow’

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DCComics.com

DCComics.com

Birds of a Feather: 2nd Black Canary costume coming to CW’s ‘Arrow’

A verge of crime-fighter galore is edging into a pluralizing trend taking-names femme fatales on superhero TV series. Mockingbird (Adrianne Palicki) doles twin-fighting stick beatdowns in superspy missions for ABC’s “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”. On the same series, Agent Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen) trenches the veteran go-to hard-hitter for Coulson’s squad of international spies. Jessica Jones for the self-titled series undergoing development for its airing on Netflix. And on a nearing spotlight, “Arrow” will bring forth its next self-obligating heir to the moniker mantle declaring Black Canary.

“Arrow” declares a sort of Long live Laurel Lance through CW’s reveal of Laurels costume assumption to her sister Sara’s crime-fighter legacy. CW released first looks at Laurels super-heroinne garb over TVLine.

That reveal holds an impressiveness defining a synonymous position juxtaposing against the Green Arrow canon that has been the long-time teaming with Miss Lance a.k.a. Black Canary. Oliver Queen sets the show’s velocity for gritty origin story pacing per season rather than within a few compartmentalized pilot-ensuing episodes. But the writers have not been stingy with more of the casts origins, episode in point for Nov. 12’s take on Arrow’s inner circle member and genius hacker in “The Secret Origin of Felicity Smoake”.

For Black Canary, a season two and three accompanying tale of the show’s first Black Canary Sara Lance has been character-driven threading starting from her cheating with Olive on his marooned yachting voyage to her final evolution graduating through the ranks of the League of Assassins. Sara’s non-quid pro quo severance from the Assassin’s didn’t sit well with the League’s leader Ra’s al Ghul along with his daughter Talia, Sara’s ex-girlfriend. A masked identity was necessary for the new Starling City bad-to-the-bone, and the show’s first Black Canary made a significant mark on the viewing audience.

In the DC Comics continuity, Dinah Lance is the person behind the Black Canary alias. The show’s adaptation has been an validating factor for the writing staff’s remix of this upper tier fan-fave into the weekly broadcast. Plus, there is the twist of geek trivia. Laurel is Dinah’s middle name, which makes the show’s handling of the Green Arrow circle of characters far more verging into show-offs, coolly so and pun intentional.

While Arrow has evolved from camouflage paint disguise across the eyes to an actual jade colored mask, Assistant District Attorney Laurel Lance has gone through life and loss. Her experiences cover withstanding ex-fiancee Oliver return after 5 years lost at sea, her new boyfriend Tommy Merlyn’s death caused by a city-wide calamity, sister Sara’s homecoming after believed dead, repairing a complicated relationship with her police-career father Quentin Lance (Paul Blackthorne) and currently falling off the wagon upon the murder of Sara. A whole spin that has brought Laurel (Katie Cassidy) progressively aligning into the “Arrow” course of introducing boxing ex-champion Ted Grant. Grant is now training her how to fight and deal with her distress and addiction.

A pathway clearing the means propelling Laurel’s going full Black Canary dramatic stick-the-landing superhero styled debut.

(TVLine)

Read More by Mark Ruffin

‘Penny Dreadful’: The Saving of Monsters

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PennyDreadful_promoposter

‘Penny Dreadful’: The Saving of Monsters

Many times when people discuss vampires in literature they usually begin to discuss two specific time periods in literature, these may be the modern paranormal romance vampire books or those not interested in cutesy vampires may point out what many consider the “first” vampire Dracula. Both are vampires that pop culture loves, loves so much that they have worn fans out with the same story of a brooding vampire that either wants to die because of love or because of the monster within him.

But, many forget that there were stories of not only vampires but of monsters in general several decades before Bram Stoker released the wonderful “Dracula” on unsuspecting readers. These stories that came during from the 19th century Victorian England period were printed for the enjoyment of young working class males were short sensationalized readings that were sold cheaply for just one penny an issue. The story was carried out over multiple issues that were released weekly.

These stories were nicknamed “penny dreadful” because they cost only a penny and many said that the writing was dreadful. The complaints were that the stories dragged on week to week much like our dreaded soap operas of today. The penny dreadful were also called penny blood because many readers at the time thought that they were very bloody and action filled.

There were many penny dreadful stories that became famous and were either read and studied multiple times and some even had television shows and movies based on them. One of the most famous of these were “Varney the Vampire: Feast of Blood” and “The String of Pearls: A Romance” that introduced Sweeney Todd to readers. These two stories are ones that readers will reread over and over and discuss for hours about social commentary of the stories. These were the first written monsters on the Victorian Age, not Dracula or Frankenstein or those that became more famous.

But, overtime the term “penny dreadful” became synonymous with gothic horror and thus the result of the Showtime hit show, “Penny Dreadful”. The show is set in Victorian England but doesn’t feature the characters of the actual penny dreadfuls of that time period but more of the monsters and action figures of the classical literature of that time.

“Penny Dreadful” centers on the struggles of the following characters: Dorian Gray of the self-titled book, “Dorian Gray”, Dr. Victor Frankenstein and his monster from “Frankenstein”, and Mina Murray and Abraham Van Helsing (though both short lived) and Sir Malcolm Murray from “Dracula”.

Vanessa Ives, a childhood friend of Mina’s, Ethan Chandler, a werewolf and an American, and Sir Malcolm Murray appear to be the monster hunters of the story whose job is to keep the evil at bay. Many people have compared this story to “The League of Extraordinary Gentleman” and there are many similarities but what this show is doing that the League did not do is to really bring the monsters, particularly the vampires in the show back to their roots.

The male vampires are very Nosferatu like and the female vampires are very ghostly revenant like, they definitely are not the cute vampires that we are flooded with today. They act as vampires would if they were real- like monsters that are very primal and need to survive. “Penny Dreadful” shows the pain, agony, and torture of being a monster and human living in that world that the author of that time wrote in the penny dreadfuls that were published at that time.

The monsters and the humans in the show, mirror the fear of life and death, of their souls and of their immortality or after life that even we face today. The longing for a connection to another human but the isolation of being a hunter, prostitute, sharp shooter, monster or narcissistic mad man. The show is a British- American show that was given only eight episodes but was quickly renewed for a ten season episode to air in 2015 schedule.

I will be honest, I resisted watching the show because of the unneeded sex scenes and I just assumed they characters were going to be all pretty and brooding like so many are today. But, once I watched a couple of episodes I became hooked. We fans of monsters, whether its television or literature must give credit to Penny Dreadful for bringing the monster back to its dark, grimy, and gothic literary roots. There may be hope for vampires and monsters to stay in the mainstream after all.

Read More by Bertena Varney

Channing Tatum’s 2013 bid is a Gambit payoff

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Credits: Marvel Comics

Credits: Marvel Comics

Channing Tatum’s 2013 bid is a Gambit payoff

 When Cajun rogue, charmer and mutant Gambit charges up his ballistic-of-choice deck of playing cards the explosive shufflle results has even rocked the likes of Sabretooth on nemesis heels.

A dealt hand is exactly what has Channing Tatum being signed to knock us back in our seats portraying the staff-wielding Louisianian. Producer Lauren Shuler Donner confirmed the signing during an interview with Total Film. The event was the X-Men X-Perience Global Tour (THR) and the UK’s blue carpet news accompanies some reasons for the casting choice.

Well you know he’s a rogue. Channing. He’s a rascal just like Remy LeBeau. So — and [Tatum] can handle the action, we all know that.

Action-hero status hasn’t been absent from Tatum’s busy acting career. Though his run in the comedy film range enumerates some critically praised movies, “The Eagle”, “Fighting” and a duo of G.I. Joe movies reaffirm Silver Screen cred for physical portrayals.

Right back in Sept. it was Tatum’s espousal to Total Film that brought his bid for playing the mutant to industry light. At this time Fox had already begun filming on the 5th installment “X-Men: Days of Future Past” with director Bryan Singer.

Gambit was a licensed character previously shown in Fox’s produced spinoff “X-Men Origins: Wolverine”. In Marvel Comics, the twenty-four years premised superhero began at Uncanny X-Men in 1990, created by Chris Claremont, renowned in X-Men for co-writing seminal story arcs, and Jim Lee, now Co-Publisher at DC Comics.

(Total Film)

Read More by Mark Ruffin

First look at ‘The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1’ includes new images

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Credits: Lionsgate

Credits: Lionsgate

First look at ‘The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1’ includes new images

It’s not the first trailer or teaser-trailer fans have been waiting for, but Lionsgate has thrown a small bone at fans of The Hunger Games franchise with a first look at The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1.

The so-called “first look” can be found via a new website, and features the first official images of Julianne Moore as President Coin, as well as a short animated GIF of Moore in character, and a few other still images from the film. Fans can also read a Q&A with Mockingjay director Francis Lawrence, producer Nina Jacobson, and screenwriter Peter Craig, plus watch a video interview with Moore.

The site is a bit confusing to navigate, but if fans dig deep enough, they can find a few new still images from Mockingjay (including some behind-the-scenes photos), and a chance to read part of the screenplay.

You can find all the images a bit more easily by checking out the slideshow attached to this article (above)!

Of course, Lionsgate still hasn’t said when a teaser or trailer for Mockingjay will debut – and that’s really what fans are clamouring right now. By this time last year, a trailer for Catching Fire had already been released. Granted, Mockingjay is still filming (and is expected to wrap-up later this month) — but most of the filming going on right now is for Part 2 of the film, which doesn’t come out until next year.

Fans just want a peek at Part 1, due in theaters this November.

What do you think of this initial sneak peek? What do you hope to see in a trailer?

Read More by Sara Gundell